Tag Archives: Montmartre

Montmartre – Beyond the Windmills and the White Wedding Cake  . . .

…lies a magical little neighborhood on a hill overlooking but somehow slightly apart from the great city of Paris spread out beneath it. The Pagan Romans called the place Mons Mars after their god of war, which conveniently converted into Montmartre, the Hill of the Martyr with the advent of Christianity. So long before there were windmills and vineyards on this hill, long before “commune freedom fighters” and artists moved in, long before the white wedding cake called Sacre Coeur was built (you either love it or hate it!), Montmartre was a place of pilgrimage. For it was here on top of this hill that one of France’s most notable Christian Martyrs and first Bishop of Paris Denis was beheaded by the Romans. Legend has it that he then picked up his severed head, dusted it off and proceeded to walk down the hill towards a presumably more congenial neighborhood where he laid his bones. Some 9 centuries later another great Bishop of Paris, Suger built  the first great Gothic cathedral in France, Saint Denis, in his honor and where today his relics still lie along with those of many of the kings and queens of France.

But that’s only the beginning Continue reading Montmartre – Beyond the Windmills and the White Wedding Cake  . . .